thewritershelpers

cleverhelp:

Novel Writing Strategy: Our Nanowrimo Word Count Spreadsheet

Starting on November 1st, thousands of people start toward the goal of writing the first 50,000 words what may be their very first novel by 11:59 PM on November 30. This project is called National Novel Writing Month, and it’s an excellent exercise for young and practicing writers. Adapting to heavy (and consistent) writing loads is an essential skill for a working writer, but divvying up your time and knowing how to make up for lost hours and days can be daunting. Inspired and built on artist Svenja Gosen’s excel sheets, we’ve put together an intelligent, shareable spreadsheet on Google Docs to help organize your writing goals and quotas. 

With this spreadsheet you can automatically: Track daily word counts, adjust goals based on headway and the the date, and view statistics on your writing progress (and share them with your friends and beta readers). Instructions are saved as a tab on the spreadsheet. Download the sheet here, and follow for more Nanowrimo and writing resources. 

icanrelateto
icanrelateto:

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icanrelateto:

usnatarchives
usnatarchives:

In celebration of American Archives Month, the National Archives is teaming up with the The Academy of American Poets. Throughout the month we’ll be publishing original poems inspired by the holdings of the National Archives. To view the poets performing their original works, visit the National Archives YouTube Channel. Today’s poem, “Catawba Cotton Mill” by David Wojahn, was inspired by a Lewis Hine photograph of child workers in North Carolina. From 1908 to 1912, Hine took approximately 5,000 photographs of children’s working and living conditions for the National Child Labor Committee. Hine photographed children engaged in a variety of industries across the United States.For the rest of the story, including David Wojahn’s poem and video, go to today’s Pieces of History blog: http://blogs.archives.gov/prologue/?p=14162. Image: “Some of the doffers and the Supt. Ten small boys and girls about this size out of a force of 40 employees.” Catawba Cotton Mill. Newton, N.C., 12/21/1908, (National Archives Identifier 523141)http://research.archives.gov/description/523141

usnatarchives:

In celebration of American Archives Month, the National Archives is teaming up with the The Academy of American Poets. Throughout the month we’ll be publishing original poems inspired by the holdings of the National Archives. To view the poets performing their original works, visit the National Archives YouTube Channel. 

Today’s poem, “Catawba Cotton Mill” by David Wojahn, was inspired by a Lewis Hine photograph of child workers in North Carolina. From 1908 to 1912, Hine took approximately 5,000 photographs of children’s working and living conditions for the National Child Labor Committee. Hine photographed children engaged in a variety of industries across the United States.

For the rest of the story, including David Wojahn’s poem and video, go to today’s Pieces of History blog: http://blogs.archives.gov/prologue/?p=14162

Image: “Some of the doffers and the Supt. Ten small boys and girls about this size out of a force of 40 employees.” Catawba Cotton Mill. Newton, N.C., 12/21/1908, (National Archives Identifier 523141)http://research.archives.gov/description/523141